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already cancelling flights. even talk about shutting down the new york transit. hurricane irene wasn't that bad. i'm not going to worry this time, sam. >> dan, we were right over here. the thing about hurricane irene, we got to remember, it was a very bad storm, it brought a lot of rain and a lot of flooding to inland areas. it didn't do the coastal damage. all of the problems that you could have with this system, coastal damage is just one, then you have rain, wind and then flooding. in this case, you have snow as well. you got those five points. maybe one point wasn't as bad in irene in the biggest part of new york. but i'll tell you in the biggest population center of new york, but that was a bad storm for a lot of folks. be prepared for this storm to have a stronger coastal effects. it may be more wind and more rain if these forecasters are right this morning. our ginger zee is right now in atlantic city, where they're getting ready for that. i remember that coastline, it barely ramps out from the water to where those casinos are, good morning. >> i have lost everything. i have n
advisory on hurrican irene. we want to go to rob marciano who will tell us what this latest advisory is about. >> it's frightening, up to 85-mile-an-hour wind now. there's a possibility from reading some nuggets from the national hurricane center that it could strengthen some more. we knew we had that possibility. still over the gulf stream where waters are still warm enough to sustain a hurricane. also getting into an environment where it favored strengthening. that's what we've seen. here it is in the satellite picture. 85-mile-an-hour winds. that's a moderate strength category one storm with possible strengthening as we go through time. about 380 miles south of new york city it's movement has picked up northerly about 15 miles an hour and we still expect that turn toward the west later on. this is huge. reading some technical stuff, the tropical storm force winds, diameter nearly 800 miles wide. that is huge. the second largest tropical system we've seen in the last few decades. hurricane force winds extend 150 miles out. the amount of damaging winds is about 350 to 400 m
irene which do cause some minor flooding in this area. they're concerned this could cause major flooding. there was a study out of columbia university that said had hurricane irene been one foot worse it could have caused an additional $50 billion in damage. the fear here is that if the water comes up over this seawall, which is right here next to me, it could flood the subway tunnels, even the electrical grid here. mayor michael bloomberg said he's considering shutting down two electrical networks in lower manhattan. that would shut down power to some 17,000 people but it could quickly get much, much higher than that. as the day continues we're expecting this storm surge to grow. high tide is about 8:50 tonight. there's a full moon so it's an even higher tide than usual. if that storm surge of six to eleven feet hits right at that bad moment, that is what concerns them most, soledad. >> of course, john, it's cold! usually when we cover these hurricanes it's much warmer. but if they lose power, as many people are predicting, 10 million people up along the east coast could lose power, you
evacuations in the low-lying areas of queens and brooklyn. he ordered that in hurricane irene and thankfully, there were no problems at that time. but officials taking this very seriously, potentially flooding in brooklyn and queens on the atlantic ocean and new york bay, as hurricane sandy bears down on the northeast. we will have continuing live coverage, throughout the hour. >> the fox extreme weather alert for you, the national hurricane center issuing the latest advisory on hurricane sandy, set to strike in the north evert. a rare super storm. the hurricane lashing north carolina with pounding winds and rain. massive waves are crashing ark shore on the outer banks. people in connecticut are bracing for the worst with the governor declaring a state of emergency there. let's return to our chief meteorologist. you know, rick, we heard mayor michael bloomberg ordering mandatory evacuations for low-lying areas in brooklyn and queens. you are talking about hundreds and thousands of people and shutting down the subway and buses. >> this happened last year in hurricane irene and it wasn't that
, ladies and gentlemen, i stood in this very spot a year ago for hurricane irene. there were some similar dire warnings then, and when the storm came, it actually leapfrogged over new york city and landed further up the hudson river and caused considerable damage there, although we didn't know it as the storm was happening and one of the things i've learned in 40 years of coverage these events is that it is always worse than it initially seems because you begin to tally the damage once daylight comes and once things get more calm. but this will not be like a traditional hurricane, this will not be something that happens in six or eight hours and then we're on with our lives and this is an enduring event, it is the collision of the three big weather systems, the tropical hurricanes, the frigid winds coming down from the north and that western low pressure system, everything's going to get churned around and it's going to be part of our lives, unfortunately, for several days, and i think, i fear that before this is over, it's going to be a story with many, many tragic ramifications. but sta
you can see the trees. hurricane irene they lost enough trees. $22,000 worth of trees fell down. this storm expected to be much tougher, more devastating than hurricane irene. look at this. that's a scaffold around an art project. new york city is full of scaffolding like that. things that we are watching today. want to head it over now to "cnn newsroom." newsroom." they're up next. -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> good morning to you. i sure hope you're keeping dry somewhere. i'm carol costello. thank you so much for being with us. we begin this morning with hurricane sandy, within hours expected to explode into this superstorm. most of us have never season anything like it in our lifetime. already huge, tropical storm force winds spanning a width of nearly 1,000 mimes. it's aiming at the heart of the east coast, the most heavily populated corridor in the country. 50 million people are expected to feel the effects. hundreds of thousands are now under evacuation orders. fema predicts damage costs of about $3 billion just for wind damage alone. heavy rains or snow, storm
in u.s. history. sandy could cause more wind and flood damage than hurricane irene did last year. new york city and especially lower manhattan saw its shares of flooding monday with water reaching record levels in some areas. and speaking of which, cnbc's bertha coombs is live for us outside the new york stock exchange this morning. thank you so much for joining us. can you tell us what conditions are like where you are and what dnlg you' damage you're seeing? >> reporter: it's actually fairly dry. last night in fact the new york stock exchange take to go twitter to dispel rumors that the trading floor was under three feet of water. if you can take a look behind me, the new york stock exchange floor is actually half a floor from the street level where those first balconies are. so for to be under water would be tremendous. we didn't have water in this part of lower manhattan despite that record surge. it was mostly over in the battery. will is significant flooding in several low lying areas especially near rivers. that's on the lower east side. we actually saw a transformer there blow
saw this last year in new york state, for example, when we got the one-two punch of hurricane irene and then the tropical storm lee. so there was quite an uptick in that sort of business. >> ted, thanks. we may catch up again to see how things have hopefully changed. >>> stick around. after the break, we'll find out how the storm could impact the election. the president is getting set to tour new jersey. stay with us for that. >>> we'll leave you with a look at how the futures are trading. the markets are reopening today on wall street. >>> welcome back to "worldwide exchange." >> here are the headlines today. >> super storm sandy leaves a massive path of devastation in its wake, and residents up and down the u.s. east coast are now starting what could be a long and costly recovery process. >> but it is back to business for the financial markets in the u.s., they're going to reopen after a few days. it may not be so easy as new york's mass transit system is still snarled. >>> plus, the force. disney has agreed to buy lucas films for $4 billion and promises a brand-new "star wars" fi
, for irene they were 7, but irene was closer to 20, i think they will be as bad. but now, look at all stores that are closed, flights that have not gone out, hotels and businesses onshore and new york city that are down for 4 days, that is a loss of income. that is 20 billion that gets me to 40. gerri: wow, okay that makes sense. people underestimate the costs. i read new york city alone is an economy with $4 billion that pumps out $ 4 billion every day, times 5 is $20 billion, not just damage you repair. it is also the loss of productivity, workdays, loss payroll, it could be far more devastating than we've been talking babout, you also said, in short term painful but longer term we get a bunch of federal dollars that will pump energy into the economy. >> absolutely, if we have $20 billion in property damage we spend more than that rebuilding, we always do, on the shore property so valuable, they will build bigger homes and businesses. obsolete capital will be replaced by modern capital. we'd get multiplier effect, you spend a dollar on infrastructure, you get a dollar 80 in gdp from additi
the winners, so to speak, and the losers because it is asymmetric, right? >>> now last year hurricane irene's initial projections were $7 billion. turned out to be $15 billion. there were a lot of ancillaries once the checks come out from the government and private insurers. stimulus to the gdp. not big enough to move the needle. this one we're getting initial projections is much bigger. the two cohorts in stocks most impacted the home depot-like places, let's call them that, they were basically moved up a day ahead of the storm and then pulled off once the market turned out to be. >> we didn't see much of that on friday in terms of home depot or at lowe's which i thought was interesting and most of the retailers have closed their books on saturday, last saturday, so the impact of the storm won't actually be seen until the following quarter or the next month when they report retail sales. lowe's is the exception. they closed books on saturday. all the runup, the generators they've sold, the batteries, the flashlights, those things were almost sold out pretty much across the board. that shou
. during irene it was 4.4. we expect to double what we had in irene. that's the problem. that's what kicked in yesterday and that's why the mandatory evacuation order was kicked in. the storm is deep in low pressure, and we expect the wind field to push this water up through long island sound and just to give you an example. you can see what's going on here in terms of how high water is. it's below the sea wall, but it's probably going to be about a good third of the way up this pole. that brings it all the way back into the battery and probably into lower parts of manhattan as well. parts of wall street will probably flood, so we anticipate this water to be much higher. the only difference in it could be the fact that it's going to come up gradually as opposed to quick like with the storm surge. not gradual in like 20 minutes but maybe over an hour or so we see that water coming up and coming up. we see the tunnels here shut down. the brooklyn tunnels now shout done, the holland tunnel is closing at 2:00 this afternoon. that's an order from the governor. when you see things like that occur
here, the effects of sandy, are already worse than what we saw with irene. >> absolutely. absolutely. >> now, you see you have packed up the dog. you were under a mandatory evacuation, but you did decide to wait until this moment. did you think that there was a time you could actually ride it out? >> yeah. >> we did until the winds really started picking up. the tide wasn't going out at all, and it was well past high tide. >> i think a lot of public officials are going to be glad that you are heeding the warning and deciding to get out. i'm going to let you get on with your boat. thank you very much for waiting. suzanne, i also want you to take a look down the street here. the guy that you see in the scuba gear, his name is paul. he is a lifeguard. paul, come on over here and talk to me here for a moment. take off the goggles and what not. i know you have been down here in the neighborhood. you've been monitoring things. obviously, you're dressed appropriately for the occasion, but i know a lot of public officials want folks like you to head on out. >> um, yes. however, i'm real clos
perdió todo, refrigeradores, comida, no tenemos nada. >>> ni irene el año pasado, ni una gota de agua entró. >>> lamento no haber salido temprano pero no se pudo. >>> no se pudo, cómo quedó la casa. >>> debajo de 4 pies de agua. >>>e ste sector de nueva jersey es una de las más afectadas, nos han contado sus historias de cómo el nivel del agua fue subiendo, pero también dice que con la colaboración de todos pudieron salir adelante de esta prueba . >>> una de 4 habitantes es hispano. >>> nos despertamos a las 11 de la noche y mi vecina nos dijo, nos inundamos y en 5 minutos esto creció impresionante. >>> aquí estamos. >>> entre los vecinos se ayudaron. >>s>sí, sí y así estamos ayudándonos. >>> durante todo el día los organismos de socorro realizaron búsquedas. >>> solo queda trabajar, es lo que queda ante esto. >>>s andy escogió un sector muy cercano a atlantic city para entrar a la costa este, nayeli chávez geller la recorrió para saber cómo está después del paso de sandy >>> la poderosa sandy no se apiadó de nueva jersey donde la furia de las olas atacaron esta
hurricane irene and giving you the side of the storms and how they compare. this image from nasa. the one on the left is hurricane sandy and right is irene. it is uncommon for a tropical system to track so far, north, especially during this time of the year >> it is so late in the year, it has taken a lot of people by surprise. we were talking about this with lynette and up to the arrival. the wind, the rain and the severity on our side of the storm. this is a perfect mix to the east and west. >>> that's right. that's our 2 degree guarantee. snow to the west. west virginia and western maryland, up to 2 to 3 feet of? snow. so, yes. you know what, even in the forecast i would not be surprised if this moved further to the east. maybe carol county, big wet flakes into the evening and tomorrow morning. that is not out of the question for right now, we're dealing with plenty of rain coming down across the area. with that, we do have flood warnings up. that's going to be through today. maybe even through tomorrow. right now, the entire viewing area is under the flood warning and even points to t
, when hurricane irene came through and the flooding that i've seen down to my left here, going out underneath the boardwalk, out on the streets where all the homes are on long beach is already much, much worse than irene. further left, because of the conditions here and the camera angle, you can't see it. but there is a lifeguard station that last year 14 months ago in irene was swept off its foundation. it's done it again. the authorities have been appealing to people all day to get out. get out of long beach a get across the bridge. >> bret: stay safe. we will head further south and correspondent steve harrigan is in ocean city, maryland. good evening, steve. >> good evening, bret. hurricane force winds here cracking over the seawall. 15 to 20-foot waves. part of the pier has been destroyed by the waves. the governor making a forceful statement saying stay in your house. this storm is going to kill people. we want to limit the loss of life. stay in the house. as many as 30,000 people now without power. as the conditions are likely to continue to get worse throughout the night. br
. >> reporter: sandy could create a storm surge larger than last year's hurricane irene. possibly filling the subway tunnels with water. >> lower manhattan is the most vulnerable spot for a storm surge. >> no doubt about they expect this to be a large problem for central new jersey, including philadelphia, atlantic city, new york city all of the way up toward boston. something that we need to pay attenti attention to. >>> now, potentially new york city, where hurricane irene last year wasn't so bad in the city itself, what would you say to people who are tempted to write this off? >> i want to remind folks about that hurricane, it was a bad storm, dan, it just didn't deliver the wind damage that new york city expected and the surge wasn't really here. but if you look inland where it was catastrophic flooding and so many folks were acted that storm. it was a terrible storm. this storm hurricane center said that it will have all of those elements focused on these big population areas, and new york city is one of them. i'm going to ask everyone to be prepared. >> all right, better safe than
quickly to change positions. already we've had more water from sandy than we did last year from irene. we're being told that protectively they'll shut off power down here soon so we hope everybody has gotten somewhere safe. sandy is coming. the question is, how will new york city handle it? the big apple has been shut down to its core. lower manhattan looks like a ghost town. wall street will be closed for consecutive days because of weather for the first time since the 1800s in a place where you have to look up to see where many live, skyscrapers are a concern. wind speeds on the ground are half those on the top floors. sometimes forcing buildings to sway. >> the further up you live the more reason you should close your drapes and just stay away from windows. >> reporter: watch this bath water slosh in a brookline high-rise in gusts of barely 40 miles an hour. half what's expected from sandy. at ground zero still under construction special precautions as teals have worked for days to disassembly a mashed down piece of machinery. fears heightened by that ten-ton steel arm dangling from a
feet higher than the water level was with irene, august a year ago. we're staying hunkered down and bringing pictures the best we can. >> we appreciate that, mike, i don't have to tell you the real estate there is hugely valuable for the state of new jersey. it is a recreational playground all summer for millions of american families. what is high tide where you are? is this the after-effect of the mean high tide on the jersey shore? >> reporter: yeah, the high tide is occurring right about now. it ranges generally between 8-8:30 between atlantic city and up here. so it is occurring right now. so we would suspect, now that the storm has gone inland, and the winds generally -- eventually will come around offshore, that it won't get much worse than this. the water won't get much higher. but again, it is already two and a half to three feet higher, at least at sandy hook than it was with irene. so that puts that in perspective. and i think when we get first flight tomorrow you will see how the entire coastline has been re-arranged from the entire storm. >> i think my wife and i had
of the water that in the last go-around, hurricane irene came up to and over the lip of the seawall there, jim cantore has staked out the ground there. jim, we have been following your progress and that of the water lev levels all day. reporter: well, brian, the storm surge, the water rise, the level is 6.6, 2.2 higher than irene. so we're waiting for the high tide to come up. for example, irene was about here. all right? and what we could see is another two and a half, three feet here, major implications, if the water gets into the lower streets of manhattan, and also the subway system. and con-ed has the power to shut it down, and the mayor has to coordinate with the mta, the cross bay, the veteran's memorial bridge, the george washington bridge, just to name a few. they're huge bridges with massive traffic. and of course that was the only way to get around. it was either by car or cab. they were going to keep the bayonne, the 70 miles an hour wind gusts were anticipated to come up this evening through the midnight hour. now, they could choose to open it tomorrow if the winds die down, which
positions. we have had more water from sandy than we did last year from irene. we are being told that p rotectively, they're going to shut off power downhill since so have everybody has gotten somewhere safe and sandy is coming the question i s, how will new york city handle it? >> the big apple has been shut down to its core. lower manhattan looks like a ghost town at wall street will be closed for consecutive days because of weather for the first time since the 18 hundreds. and place we have to look up to see were many people live, spiked scrapers are a concern and wind speeds on the ground or half of those of those on the top floors sometimes forcing buildings to s way. >> the further up you live, the re reason you should close your dreams and just stay away from windows. >> reporter: watched the bath water sloshing a brooklyn high- rise in gusts of barely 40 miles an h our, half of what is expected by sandy. at ground zero still under construction special precautions as teams worked at two get machinery tied down and fears heightened by 10-ton steel arm dangling from a high-rise bui
including this one. so only twice before irene being one of them. here's why. the storm is still 24 to 36 hours away. the flow starting to flow up over that and you see this barrier, it could easily with a 10 to 20-foot rise wave up and there's the iconic boardwalk some being boarded up so taking it very seriously not only here in atlantic city but through the barrier islands up the jersey shore. and that's who it's going to hit. right to those graphics. i need to show you who will get what and when. that storm surge very important. i want to show you exactly what to expect here. 6 to 9 feet in that red area or 4 to 8 feet, excuse me, in that magenta area and then the blue still, you've got a 1 to 3-foot surge and all coming from the southeast end to the northwest. let me show you the wind forecast, because sam showed you how big and how many people will be involved in this. but look at how high those wind speeds go, 60 to 80 miles per hour, pittsburgh, d.c., new york city and boston in that red zone, and, of course, it extends all the way back to the eastern great lakes too. we'll watch
learned from last year's hurricane irene. here's the local mayor. all right, well, we talked to the local mayor earlier and they are prepared under 24-hour operations here trying to keep the lines of communication open with residents here who chose not to evacuate as well as keeping up-to-date with everything going on in terms of emergency responses and any type of damage that may come because of hurricane sandy, don and chad. >> sandy, standby. we have chad myers here again. sandy, you can play along in this as well. so we have sandra, chad is in ocean city, maryland, 200 miles north of georgia. georgia is getting pelted at this point. how long before sandy starts to feel what he's feeling? >> there are arms on this storm. they are almost like you see a picture of the hurricane with spiral bands. that's what we have with the storm. let me walk over here to describe what you're going to look at for the next 36 hours. i want you to know when you see it what you're seeing. there's the center of the storm right there, don. wherever there's color, that's where it is storming. that's where it
of the restaurant here. he was telling us that basically it was highest he had ever seen. he was here for irene last year. he has been with the restaurant for about a decade here at battery gardens. saying again it was the most water he had ever seen come up. he seas if it gets to be the 11-foot level, melissa, that will be trouble. he will predicts that will go above the two levels of terrace he has and begin to seep into his restaurant there. back to you. melissa: wow, robert gray, down at battery, normally one of the most beautiful places in manhattan at the very southern tip. thanks so much for that report. >>> the storm expected to hit an area responsible for 6.5% of the country's refining capacity. does that mean gas prices are about a spike? stock exchanges shuttered today and tomorrow. what will happen when trading starts again? price futures group senior market analyst phil flynn has been following all the stories for us. i want to ask you, philings because you're at cme. s&p futures will open about an hour from now. investor sentiment pent up because markets closed today and tomorrow. what
year, hurricane irene had less than five feet of surge. but that made driving through the wall street area an adventure. new york city is lucky to have the high-rises. be very clear. this ain't irene. the water will come. could be 8, 10, 12 feet high. as brave as you are, we won't be here tomorrow morning in this spot. >> we won't. a lot of tourists are out now, now gnat we have daylight out. there's much more of the storm to come. we'll cover it all morning long. >> let's take a look at the tourists. times square normally crammed with traffic at this time. people out there walking around, taking it all in. sandy has forced new york city officials to shut down the subways for the second time in in city's history. josh, a lot fewer people than usual. >> it's not just less crowded. everything here is shuttered. the winds pick up the rain again starts to fall. this is a subway station closed for business. not the only station that is. every station throughout the city is closed as new york prepares for the superstorm. this morning, the largest transit system in the country closed down. t
're all so unique. i try to focus on the consequences. for the northeast, i think after last year's irene, we pretty well reminded everybody northeast has a hurricane threat. >> all right. >> they would like to reopen trading by wednesday of this week at the latest. >> do many insurance companies cover this type of sdmer. >> many don't. they don't include flood insurance, water damage. many homeowners if they look at their policies will recognize that hurricanes in many cases aren't covered. they would have to buy insurance through the government insurance for flooding and many haven't done that. we might find out there are plenty of people after this that don't have the coverage they would need. >> thank you. >>> the presidential campaigns have canceled more than a dozen events because of sandy. president obama called off appearances today in florida, ohio, and virginia. and another one tomorrow in wisconsin so he can monitor storm developments. we have more from the obama campaign from orlando. >> reporter: good morning, charlie, nornora, and viewers in the west.
unprecedented proportions. to put things in perspective. hurricane irene which you can see her on the right caused nearly $16 billion in damage and take a look at sandy in comparison. with sandy expected to linger over the northeast for days one can only imagine if the difference in size will reflect the difference in damage. we'll have the latest on the storm track and its strength in one minute. rick? >> reporter: the winds have picked up even more from last hour. steady now in the 40s and 50s with gusts but feel like over 0 miles per hour. i can't even read the wind gauge or turn into the rain because rain and sand is pelting us it many pretty painful. we are just after low tide. so the surf i'll it's rough is not encroaching on the boardwalk at this point and ocean avenue is still relatively dry. but other roads in the community are under water and many other roads across the state of new jersey are hazardous. the garden state parkway has been closed from exit 63 south to cape may. that's a major highway in new jersey shut down because of flooding in both directions. in fact atlantic ci
manhattan shattering the previous record that because set by eileen whic irene which folks thought was pretty bad 14 months ago. sandy was nearly 1600 miles when it caught up with the winter storm in diameter and created very dangerous seas over a stretch of the atlant atlantic nearly 1600 miles in diameter. it has been a devastating storm. we are waiting right now for an update from the new york city mayor michael bloomberg on all of this. you've seen our reporters have been out there this morning and been devastating.us the damage that the scene where mayor bloomberg will be moments away. look at these pictures, it literally rushed into the shoreline of new jersey last night. 80-mile an hour wind there, pushed a wall of water inland -frbgs looking a -- look at the flooding in these areas. this shows us the true scope but it's yet to be completely understood. we start this with a brand-new hour of "america's newsroom." i'm martha maccallum. >> i'm bill hemmer. good morning again we are live in the battleground state, columbus, ohio today. the mayor again briefs in a matter of mome
: well, we should look at irene. this will cause at least as much problem as irene. i expect this to get their act right back together and do not be viced if this is a category two or category three by sunday before it turned to the northwest. it is very warm water in the atlantic. very warm. we back in the 1950s. we had ten major hurricanes on the east coast including hazel in 1954 in mid-october which had a path similar to this but it was to the west. that want into north carolina and you notice this storm is attacking from the southeast, right? and basically, it is that path superimposed to the east so hazel led to wind gusts at 100. >>neil: what makes it a mess for the northeast, combining with the other areas? >>guest: what makes it, (a), it moves slow and intensifies miling water to the northeast beaches. that is first. >>neil: and it sits? >>guest: full moon and look at the way the coast is shaped. it is shaped so you funnel water into new york city and push the storm surge in. the normal hurricane like irene comes along the coast and heads for long island and we get flooding alon
. for irene, i'll step out of the way. you can see irene, over 600,000 without power. of course, a lot of folks remember that. that was just a year ago with the derecho during one of our hottest times of the year and temperature over 100 degrees, we had a million people without power. that was the system that came in fast. and without of course, a lot of preparation. sandy, over 450,000 without power. so less of an impact in terms of power outages but a the downed trees throughout the area that had to be dealt with. such a large storm system that's having impact on the rest of the country. one that we will truly remember for quite a long time. 43 degrees is our current temperature with the south win at ten miles per hour. we're still feeling that moisture in the air. so as temperatures drop overnight, it will be a chilly start to the day tomorrow. in the 30s. 35, frederick. 38 in la plata. we'll have a lot more on sandy's aftermath coming up in a couple minutes. >> thanks. >>> the next big project when it comes to sandy is the clean-up. prince george's county bureau chief tracee wilkin
across the new york airports. with this one in particular, a little bit different from hurricane irene and the high tide and the flooding in the search that is going on. we are keenly interested in whether the airports will be at flood stage. that is a real possibility with this one. neil: what happens? is it done in the order of flights that were canceled immediately? if you were among those who had a flight canceled yesterday, you were first up to get your flight back off the tarmac today or tomorrow? how does it work? >> the best analogy is a thousand piece jigsaw puzzle that gets thrown in the middle of the table. trying to put back together as fast as you can, but there is a lot of systems that goes into that. this one is unique because it's not just the weather disruption, but also a system disruption to us because we really evacuated 60 aircraft out of the northeast all the way from washington to boston. neil: where did you bring him? obviously want them out of harms way. >> absolutely. we have some in the midwest. the first order is to get the fleet left where it belongs. then
surge if it is as forecast, which will be worse than hurricane irene last year, could create some serious problems in terms of getting in to the subway system, in terms of getting into the con ed steam lines and potentially the electrical system. and so even if the wind doesn't blow out power, there could be pry empty differen preemptive power outages. so that's one of the many reasons that they decided to hunger down with all the financial markets. stay home, there's money to be made later and we'll just deal with it. for now just a little bit of a breeze blowing here. that is clearly supposed to chan change. >> where do you go later? >> you have to find a pole, right? you know that that's -- every guy out in a strong breeze, you've seen -- you've got to find a pole around there, right? >> i'll look for it. there's light poles and stuff, but i think i need to get a little further away from the water. >> yeah, that would be a good idea, too. >> we'll have to get him a bungee cord. okay. let's get a little bit more on the forecast on the storm in maria larosa. >> as you mentioned,
before hurricane irene, chris christie told people in no uncertain terms and i will quote him here, get the hell outfit beach. my question to you, are people heeding his message to get out and get to safer ground? >> reporter: you know, they are. and you may remember, he caught some criticism for using those strong words last year after what people along the immediate jersey shore felt was an overreaction. certainly after irene's disaster, turned out to be a wise choice, especially for those living along the immediately shoreline. here in asbury park and up and down the northern coastline of new jersey, they have certainly heeded his warning. here's a look at the surf that continues to pour in. the tide is actually receding now. but i've only seen it go down maybe five, ten feet in the last 20 minutes because the actual surge continues to push water over what should be dry, sandy beach here. but obviously that's not the case. so i think throughout the afternoon, even though the tide is going down, we're going to see it hold where it is. and when high tide comes again later on tonight ar
.6 foot rise. that's going to bring the water because i remember i was here with irene, it was up to the top of these benches. now you're talking about water that's going to be about this high. so i think it's without question that we're going to flood the battery here. how much of this water gets in the subway system, i don't know. >> what about the wind? >> a lot of reports suggest -- what was that? >> are we going to see something like you see in kansas where you see roofs blown over after acres and acres of property. are we going to see that kind of wind damage in the northeast this time? >> reporter: don't think of what i'm getting here is representative of the wind because it's really not. i'm protected from the buildings. but we have gusts already out at montauk at 71. this is not like where you're going to have 130-mile-per-hour winds, so, no, the answer to that question is no, but there will be so much tree damage we think across interior pennsylvania and new york and new jersey, even parts of new england, back down through west virginia that that's a big concern. i mean,
irene. keep in mind we are still high -- i lost track of what time it is but high tide is not until 7:30 and the wind keeps on increasing. the tide's coming n. we've got more and more rain so all this water is just going to get so much worse and especially when you think that we are only at the very, very beginning of this storm. we still have at least 36 hours to go here in rehoboth beach with hurricane sandy. and this has been going on since yesterday at around 4:00 in the afternoon. that's when we first started to really feel wow, that is probably the first big gust that i felt since we've been out here. we've been seeing really sustained winds that have been increasing throughout the night. but really within the last half- hour or so is when we first started to feel these huge gusts just coming in from the beach. we've got wave heights of about well over 20 feet now off the shore and it's just going to keep on getting worse. yesterday i talked with the governor of delaware. he was saying that already yesterday afternoon it was looking so much worse then that it was at the peak of
of magnitude here. this is twice the number of impacted households as hurricane irene. hurricane irene was 1.2 million impacted households and this is 2.4 million impacted households. 1.2 million of the 2.4 million for pse&g, 935,000 from jcp & l. 195,000 from atlantic city electric and 45,000 from orange in rockland. during hurricane irene restoration took eight days for full restoration. for hurricane sandy, the full restoration may, in fact, take longer. full damage assessment will not be complete until 24 to 48 hours due to some of the weather delays. they cannot develop the timeframe for restoration until damage and estimates are under way and obviously these difficult weather conditions are making this more of a challenge. however the utility companies have reached out to other states for assistance and we are expecting additional linemen. servicemen and free clearing workers from states as far away as texas, indiana and folks coming in to us from canada. it will remain extremely dangerous in areas where trees and wires are down. ask people to use extreme caution and assume any wire yo
received? >> we don't have the exact counts on that. there is water damage. >> hurricane irene, we know state wide $1.3 billion in damages your community affect bid that. any lessons learned from that in 2011? >> we here abide by our planning and execute our 120 hour plan of giving people plenty of notice in an impending danger is coming. and we always hope for the best. unfortunately, the worst has come. >> okay. finally wrapping up any word you have to residents you that want to leave with them with this sneng. >> only use 911 for life threatening emergencies. nor nonlife threatening emergencies use our nonlife threatening emergency hot line. >> thank you. we'll check back in with you. thank you. >> this storm is making its presence felt now. sandy taking aim at the nornl east this hour. warnings to head for higher ground coming for days now. coming up next, we're live where 30,000 people were told to get out and get out, fast. >> catastrophic event we have faced in any of our lifetimes. >> there will be people who die in this storm. >> this is not the time to be a show off or stupid.
irene, which hit last august in the same area. but by any measure, this storm, seemingly crushed irene. there really is no comparison, right? >> there's no comparison. i guess you could say, this is kind of like new york city's katrina. just devastating impacts here. this historic surge, 13 feet. all of that water coming on and those high wind gusts. worst-case scenario did pan out here, unfortunately. >> all right. mark mancuso, from accuweather. thanks for joining us this morning, mark. >>> straight ahead, more of our continuing coverage of sandy. the airlines trying to get back to normalcy. and what the red cross is doing to help out. >>> plus, more incredible video from across the storm zone, including rescues that didn't have to happen. we'll be right back. new pink lemonade 5-hour energy? 5-hour energy supports the avon foundation for women breast cancer crusade. >>> welcome back, everyone. 5 million people take the new york city subways every day. and this morning, the entire system is shut down. seven subway tunnels under the east river are flooded. and the electricity that pow
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